The Pew Research Center states that approximately seven out of every 10 Americans use social media in some form, and you are likely part of this large group. Social media use is also growing, as 72% of Americans now use some type of social media compared with half in 2011.

If social media is part of your daily life, you may eagerly share updates, thoughts, photos and other information with your friends and family on these platforms every day. When going through a divorce, it is important to follow certain guidelines when using social media to protect your best interests moving forward.

1. Change your passwords

You may have shared everything with your spouse during your marriage, including passwords to your social media accounts. Even if you believe your spouse will not try and log onto these accounts, change your passwords as soon as possible.

2. Refrain from posting negative words about your spouse

The divorce process is difficult on an emotional level, and you may want to express your frustration and anger on social media to gain support. Although this is a temptation, refrain from posting any negative information about your spouse online. Instead, share these frustrations with a trusted friend, family member or therapist.

3. Update tagging permissions

The easiest way to prevent showing up in your friends’ and family members’ photos online that could potentially portray your actions in a negative light is to change your photo tagging settings. This should allow you to review any tags before they show up publicly on your profiles.

4. Avoid turning your friends into spies

Even if you no longer have a connection with your spouse on social media, you may still have friends who do. Although it is tempting, do not ask your friends to snoop around your spouse’s profiles for information about what they are up to.

In the era of social media, we’re accustomed to making every life event public. However, it’s important to understand that anything you post on social media could potentially be used as evidence against you in your divorce. Taking smart steps to shield your divorce from the public eye can benefit you in the long run.